Mandurah teen takes out top international Royal Life Saving award for performing CPR

Dudley Park resident Megan Larmour took out an international Royal Life Saving award for her leadership and persistence in attempting to save a man's life. Photo: Supplied.
Dudley Park resident Megan Larmour took out an international Royal Life Saving award for her leadership and persistence in attempting to save a man's life. Photo: Supplied.

Most of us haven't had to perform CPR once in our lives let alone twice.

That was the case for 18-year-old Megan Larmour who first performed CPR when she was only 16 and again last year.

Being a lifeguard at the Mandurah Aquatic and Recreation Centre you would expect the incident to happen at the pool, however, Ms Larmour was enjoying a coffee before school when she had to spring to action.

"I saw these two ladies outside that looked in distress - one of them was on the phone but I didn't think much of it," Ms Larmour said.

"Then five minutes later one woman came running in because a man in the carpark had collapsed so I put my hand up to help."

Discovering he wasn't breathing, Ms Larmour started doing compressions with another bystander.

Once a defibrillator arrived she knew how to attach the device and shocked the man twice before the ambulance got there.

"His heart restarted but unfortunately he passed away in hospital - luckily his family were able to say goodbye and his organs were able to be donated," she said.

"It was a bittersweet moment in a horrible situation."

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Ms Larmour took out an international Royal Life Saving award, the Russell Medal, for her leadership and persistence in attempting to save the man's life.

This comes following Ms Larmour receiving a bravery award for her efforts in 2019.

"I feel like I'm just a normal teenager then I got this bravery award," Ms Larmour said.

"It was a bit of a shock because I don't think what I did was some big, heroic action - I just do what I can to help people.

"I think if it was me or my family I would hope someone would help."

"The medal is pretty snazzy at least," she laughed.

I recommend everyone does first aid training and CPR because you never know when something could go wrong.

Megan Larmour

Her ability to stay calm in emergency situations came in handy once again when her neighbour suffered from a heart attack.

"Myself and my dad performed CPR together but sadly he didn't make it," Ms Larmour said.

"It was hard because you know your neighbours but you just have to put a block there."

Reacting well in emergency situations confirmed her wish to follow a career in nursing. Ms Larmour is now in her second year of nursing at Murdoch University while also juggling part-time jobs and swimming competitively.

For Ms Larmour, receiving first aid training has been invaluable and she encouraged everyone else to learn.

"I recommend everyone does first aid training and CPR because you never know when something could go wrong," she said.

"I never thought by the time I was 18 I would have to perform CPR twice.

"Even if you aren't comfortable performing CPR if you can talk someone through it could help - you could save that person's life."

This story 'I went into autopilot': Mandurah resident performs CPR twice before the age of 18 first appeared on Mandurah Mail.