Cannery Arts Centre to celebrate Andrew Hyde's legacy

Sharing the gift of art: David Hyde has gathered his brother Andrew's vast collection of artistic works to be featured in a mixed media retrospective at the Cannery Arts Centre from February 15 to 23. Photo: Sarah Makse.
Sharing the gift of art: David Hyde has gathered his brother Andrew's vast collection of artistic works to be featured in a mixed media retrospective at the Cannery Arts Centre from February 15 to 23. Photo: Sarah Makse.

A retrospective exhibition showcasing the work of multi-talented Esperance artist Andrew Hyde will be held at the Cannery Arts Centre from February 15.

The exhibition titled 'The Sacred and the Profane' will collate more than 37 original paintings, hundreds of sketches, stories and poems.

Coordinated by his brother David, the show will be a celebration of Andrew's diverse talents 10 years after his passing.

Mr Hyde said his brother's work had traveled to Esperance from the homes of his eight siblings across the country.

"It is to celebrate his life down the track and to see the gift he left us because it has all been scattered everywhere. None of us had seen it together, so it is going to be quite amazing to see in one place," he said.

Mr Hyde said his brother had always been a passionate artist, but truly dedicated himself to painting when he moved to Esperance in the early 2000s.

Inspired by his love of the coast, Andrew painted colourful abstract pieces inspired by the beauty and isolation of his surroundings using any medium he could find from house points, oils to acrylics.

"He was always a water person, a fisherman and when he moved here he mentioned that was what really began him painting," he said.

"I just really admire the urgency and vibrancy with which he expressed himself regardless of technical limitations or lack of materials. He could teach us all to make something out of nothing."

Mr Hyde said he hoped the exhibition was an opportunity for friends and family to reflect on his brother's vast artistic achievements.

"He was very outspoken, incredibly intelligent and astute in a self educated way. He didn't pursue tertiary education but he read actively his whole life and gained so much from what he read," he said.

"Anyone who got to know him were just blown away by what he had to offer in terms of culture and intellect.

"I remember him with great sadness, joy and thankfulness.

"None of us will ever forget him and I think we are all the richer for having known him and the way he challenged the world and challenged us."

The exhibition will be held from February 15 to 23.