Esperance schools show support for World Diabetes Day

Nulsen to go blue for diabetes: Nulsen Primary School students Zara Unwin, Byron Johnston, Dajhana Dimer, Elouise Munmurrie and Jakob McKenzie with principal David Callow and Ian Campbell. Photo: Sarah Makse.
Nulsen to go blue for diabetes: Nulsen Primary School students Zara Unwin, Byron Johnston, Dajhana Dimer, Elouise Munmurrie and Jakob McKenzie with principal David Callow and Ian Campbell. Photo: Sarah Makse.

Esperance schools are rallying behind a local doing his part for World Diabetes Day.

After losing his wife to diabetes complications three years ago, Ian Campbell has been raising awareness of the rapidly growing disease.

This year he has garnered the support of Nulsen Primary School, Esperance Primary School, Esperance Senior High School and Castletown Primary School.

The schools will hold fundraising and awareness activities for World Diabetes Day on November 14.

Mr Campbell said he wanted to educate the community about the devastating, but preventable illness.

"I saw what it did to my family, my wife suffered with it for about ten years," he said.

"It affects the whole family, I had to stop work to look after her, but it was not just me, the rest of the family are called on to help as well.

"Type two is quite manageable, it's not a death sentence, but most people don't want to make life changes and when they do it's usually too late."

According to Diabetes WA, 28 people are diagnosed with diabetes every day in Western Australia and 4.3 per cent of people in Esperance live with type two diabetes.

Mr Campbell thanked the schools for their support and hoped it would bring attention to the issue across the state.

"If we continue to promote diabetes awareness hopefully we can get the message out there and get some results," he said

Nulsen Primary School will get behind the cause for a second year, holding a World Diabetes Day assembly and blue free dress day.

Nulsen Primary School principal David Callow said the school was pleased to show their support.

"I'm always happy to get behind anyone in the community who is raising awareness of health," he said.

"I have also had family who have been affected by diabetes and it is pretty much an unknown cause of illness.

"People don't understand the consequences of diabetes over the long term and the impact that it can have on your life if you don't look after yourself properly.

"It is important to raise awareness among our students."