Esperance music, 47th Annual Esperance Music Festival applications opening soon

Festival excitement: Piano students Lockie and Charlie eagerly receive their entry forms for the Festival from local piano teacher Timothy Holland. Photo: Andrea Liddelow.

Festival excitement: Piano students Lockie and Charlie eagerly receive their entry forms for the Festival from local piano teacher Timothy Holland. Photo: Andrea Liddelow.

Are you a classical buff or more of a blues aficionado? What is your favourite instrument? Whatever your answer is, and thanks to the generous financial support from Southern Ports Authority, you have the opportunity to perform or enjoy performances at the 47th Annual Esperance Music Festival.

If you can play an instrument or sing, the festival provides a unique opportunity to meet others in the same field.

There is plenty of scope in the programme to suit most musicians including piano, strings, guitar, brass, woodwind, jazz, voice, contemporary amplified and percussion. Adam Pinto, pianist, composer and lecturer at UWA, will be adjudicating performances this year.

The Non-Adjudicated Section is specifically included in the programme for family members or friends who’d just like the experience of performing on stage. Entry forms are included in schedules available from Esperance Newsagency, on Esperance Community Arts website, from your music teacher or at Entry Day on Sunday, 10 June 2018 from 10am – 2pm at the Seventh Day Adventist Church, where festival committee members will be on hand to assist.

Here is your entry day checklist: Attach a photocopy of your music; sign the APRA/AMCOS (copyright) declaration forms; time your piece, including accompaniment (Festival committee members can help with this if you’re unsure); if you are performing with more than three people, get creative with a name for your group; be sure to record any restrictions you have and; if you intend using a backing track, tick the box at the bottom of the entry form. The Festival encourages aspiring performers of all ages in the pursuit of excellence.

It offers the chance to build confidence and skills through performing to an audience, allows performers to enjoy a sense of achievement and provides feedback from an independent, expert adjudicator.

Musicians, composers, bands, choirs and orchestras enter to compete in the festival for leisure and, while cash prizes are attached to some items, for the most part people take part for personal satisfaction and enjoyment.

Some of the items in the programme are supported by The Australian Music Examinations Board for students under 18. Students attaining a particular AMEB grade know that their achievement is nationally recognised. As soon as entries have been received and put into the database, programming begins.

To create a pleasing audience experience, a varied programme is presented for each session. The adjudicator is looking for good technique, rhythm, phrasing, expression and interpretation of the piece. When these elements come together, the performer and audience share a rewarding musical moment.

This year’s festival will be held from August 16 – 18 at the Esperance Civic Centre. For more, contact EMF president Irene Melbourne on 0429 339 006 or email idmelbourne@westnet.com.au